Gaming the System: How the Political Strategies of Private Prison Companies Promote Ineffective Incarceration Policies


Over the past 15 years, the number of people held in all prisons in the United States has increased by 49.6 percent, while private prison populations have increased by 353.7 percent, according to recent federal statistics.

Paul Ashton, Justice Policy Institute
Published: June 22, 2011

At a time when many policymakers are looking at criminal and juvenile justice reforms that would safely shrink the size of our prison population, the existence of private prison companies creates a countervailing interest in preserving the current approach to criminal justice and increasing the use of incarceration.

While private prison companies may try to present themselves as just meeting existing demand for prison beds and responding to current market conditions, in fact they have worked hard over the past decade to create markets for their product. As revenues of private prison companies have grown over the past decade, the companies have had more resources with which to build political power, and they have used this power to promote policies that lead to higher rates of incarceration.

For-profit private prison companies primarily use three strategies to influence policy: lobbying, direct campaign contributions, and building relationships, networks, and associations.

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3 thoughts on “Gaming the System: How the Political Strategies of Private Prison Companies Promote Ineffective Incarceration Policies

  1. Speaking of private prison companies:

    Huge Wrongful Death Verdict
    The GEO Group has just been slapped with a $6.5 million verdict for the wrongful death of a prisoner in their facility in Lawton, Oklahoma.

    http://is.gd/EhwByk

    Like

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